Ein Besuch bei Mozilla und den Frauen, die das Web besser machen

Ein Besuch bei Mozilla und den Frauen, die das Web besser machen:

Auch Anna-Lena König möchte Frauen in der Tech-Branche unterstützen und vernetzen. Als Produkt- und Projektmanagerin in der Softwaredevelopment Agentur Evenly koordiniert sie die Entwicklung mobiler Apps. Einmal im Monat organisiert sie mit Emanuela Meet-Ups für die „Ladies That UX Berlin“, die im Oktober 2017 auch im Berliner Mozilla Büro zu Gast waren. Für Anna-Lena ist der offene Austausch essentiell: „Manchmal reicht es eben schon, wenn man weiß, dass andere Menschen ähnliche Gedanken und Herausforderungen haben.“ Und, dass man diese Herausforderungen auch gemeinsam angehen kann. Denn niemand kann das Web alleine verbessern. Aber das muss man ja zum Glück auch nicht.

Mozilla Berlin hat mir und ein paar anderen Frauen neulich ein paar Fragen gestellt. Es geht um das Internet und warum es wichtig ist, dass es für alle zugänglich bleibt. Aus meinen Antworten wurde das Thema Bloggen hervorgehoben. Den Artikel muss ich natürlich der Vollständigkeit halber nun auch hier im Blog verlinken.

Passend zum Thema “Offenes Internet” empfehle ich auch auf netzpolitik.org zum Thema Netzneutralität auf dem Laufenden zu bleiben.

via Tumblr http://ift.tt/2FWuYXP

Advertisements

Ein Besuch bei Mozilla und den Frauen, die das Web besser machen

Ein Besuch bei Mozilla und den Frauen, die das Web besser machen:

Auch Anna-Lena König möchte Frauen in der Tech-Branche unterstützen und vernetzen. Als Produkt- und Projektmanagerin in der Softwaredevelopment Agentur Evenly koordiniert sie die Entwicklung mobiler Apps. Einmal im Monat organisiert sie mit Emanuela Meet-Ups für die „Ladies That UX Berlin“, die im Oktober 2017 auch im Berliner Mozilla Büro zu Gast waren. Für Anna-Lena ist der offene Austausch essentiell: „Manchmal reicht es eben schon, wenn man weiß, dass andere Menschen ähnliche Gedanken und Herausforderungen haben.“ Und, dass man diese Herausforderungen auch gemeinsam angehen kann. Denn niemand kann das Web alleine verbessern. Aber das muss man ja zum Glück auch nicht.

Mozilla Berlin hat mir und ein paar anderen Frauen neulich ein paar Fragen gestellt. Es geht um das Internet und warum es wichtig ist, dass es für alle zugänglich bleibt. Aus meinen Antworten wurde das Thema Bloggen hervorgehoben. Den Artikel muss ich natürlich der Vollständigkeit halber nun auch hier im Blog verlinken.

Passend zum Thema “Offenes Internet” empfehle ich auch auf netzpolitik.org zum Thema Netzneutralität auf dem Laufenden zu bleiben.

via Tumblr http://ift.tt/2FWuYXP

Ein Besuch bei Mozilla und den Frauen, die das Web besser machen

Ein Besuch bei Mozilla und den Frauen, die das Web besser machen:

Auch Anna-Lena König möchte Frauen in der Tech-Branche unterstützen und vernetzen. Als Produkt- und Projektmanagerin in der Softwaredevelopment Agentur Evenly koordiniert sie die Entwicklung mobiler Apps. Einmal im Monat organisiert sie mit Emanuela Meet-Ups für die „Ladies That UX Berlin“, die im Oktober 2017 auch im Berliner Mozilla Büro zu Gast waren. Für Anna-Lena ist der offene Austausch essentiell: „Manchmal reicht es eben schon, wenn man weiß, dass andere Menschen ähnliche Gedanken und Herausforderungen haben.“ Und, dass man diese Herausforderungen auch gemeinsam angehen kann. Denn niemand kann das Web alleine verbessern. Aber das muss man ja zum Glück auch nicht.

Mozilla Berlin hat mir und ein paar anderen Frauen neulich ein paar Fragen gestellt. Es geht um das Internet und warum es wichtig ist, dass es für alle zugänglich bleibt. Aus meinen Antworten wurde das Thema Bloggen hervorgehoben. Den Artikel muss ich natürlich der Vollständigkeit halber nun auch hier im Blog verlinken.

Passend zum Thema “Offenes Internet” empfehle ich auch auf netzpolitik.org zum Thema Netzneutralität auf dem Laufenden zu bleiben.

via Tumblr http://ift.tt/2FWuYXP

Ein Besuch bei Mozilla und den Frauen, die das Web besser machen

Ein Besuch bei Mozilla und den Frauen, die das Web besser machen:

Auch Anna-Lena König möchte Frauen in der Tech-Branche unterstützen und vernetzen. Als Produkt- und Projektmanagerin in der Softwaredevelopment Agentur Evenly koordiniert sie die Entwicklung mobiler Apps. Einmal im Monat organisiert sie mit Emanuela Meet-Ups für die „Ladies That UX Berlin“, die im Oktober 2017 auch im Berliner Mozilla Büro zu Gast waren. Für Anna-Lena ist der offene Austausch essentiell: „Manchmal reicht es eben schon, wenn man weiß, dass andere Menschen ähnliche Gedanken und Herausforderungen haben.“ Und, dass man diese Herausforderungen auch gemeinsam angehen kann. Denn niemand kann das Web alleine verbessern. Aber das muss man ja zum Glück auch nicht.

Mozilla Berlin hat mir und ein paar anderen Frauen neulich ein paar Fragen gestellt. Es geht um das Internet und warum es wichtig ist, dass es für alle zugänglich bleibt. Aus meinen Antworten wurde das Thema Bloggen hervorgehoben. Den Artikel muss ich natürlich der Vollständigkeit halber nun auch hier im Blog verlinken.

Passend zum Thema “Offenes Internet” empfehle ich auch auf netzpolitik.org zum Thema Netzneutralität auf dem Laufenden zu bleiben.

via Tumblr http://ift.tt/2FWuYXP

Ein Besuch bei Mozilla und den Frauen, die das Web besser machen

Ein Besuch bei Mozilla und den Frauen, die das Web besser machen:

Auch Anna-Lena König möchte Frauen in der Tech-Branche unterstützen und vernetzen. Als Produkt- und Projektmanagerin in der Softwaredevelopment Agentur Evenly koordiniert sie die Entwicklung mobiler Apps. Einmal im Monat organisiert sie mit Emanuela Meet-Ups für die „Ladies That UX Berlin“, die im Oktober 2017 auch im Berliner Mozilla Büro zu Gast waren. Für Anna-Lena ist der offene Austausch essentiell: „Manchmal reicht es eben schon, wenn man weiß, dass andere Menschen ähnliche Gedanken und Herausforderungen haben.“ Und, dass man diese Herausforderungen auch gemeinsam angehen kann. Denn niemand kann das Web alleine verbessern. Aber das muss man ja zum Glück auch nicht.

Mozilla Berlin hat mir und ein paar anderen Frauen neulich ein paar Fragen gestellt. Es geht um das Internet und warum es wichtig ist, dass es für alle zugänglich bleibt. Aus meinen Antworten wurde das Thema Bloggen hervorgehoben. Den Artikel muss ich natürlich der Vollständigkeit halber nun auch hier im Blog verlinken.

Passend zum Thema “Offenes Internet” empfehle ich auch auf netzpolitik.org zum Thema Netzneutralität auf dem Laufenden zu bleiben.

via Tumblr http://ift.tt/2FWuYXP

mobile UX — OS features 🤖

This is the last part of my blogpost series “7 aspects that improve the UX of your app”.

OS features are a big reason why we build apps instead of just mobile websites. They can provide a much better experience.

Some examples of useful features:

  • control center (for example when you have a music stream in your app it should be possible to play/pause the stream in the control center)
  • push notifications
    deeplinks (when users share content from your app, this should open the exact content in their friends app)
    always check out new features of the operating systems, there are often new possibilities to improve the overall UX of your app by adapting to new features of iOS and Android.
  • widgets, like this news widget and next game widget we built for the HSV app: 

What are features that you are still missing from iOS or Android operating systems? Send me a message if you would like to exchange ideas!

via Tumblr http://ift.tt/2C0HCC4

mobile UX — accessibility 🕶

This is topic number 6 from my blogpost series “7 aspects that improve the UX of your app”.

Making your app accessible is important because you want to make it usable for people with disabilities. You probably already have that in mind. However, i want to remind you that there is also „situational disability“ and that the number of users, who benefit from your efforts in making the app accessible, is much higher than you might think.

For example, when you design your app to be used easily with one hand, you’re not only doing that for people with one arm, you’re doing it for everyone. Anyone could be in a situation where they can’t use both hands to hold their phone. That’s an easy example but the same goes for seeing, hearing and speaking. Designing your app in a way that it is easily usable, really benefits everyone.

Check out this chart: (source

What can you do?

  • include accessibility into your product discovery phase right from the beginning
  • consider the aspects related to screen sizes and reachable navigation
  • know your target group and their needs
  • adapt your app to support OS features like text-to-speech
  • test with real users to find out how well they can use your app
  • use tools like the Accessibility Scanner for Android Apps in addition to user tests

via Tumblr http://ift.tt/2kTuvbh

mobile UX — object-oriented UX 📦

This is blogpost number 5 in my series “7 aspects that improve the UX of your app”.

image

Object-oriented UX is a concept i learned about this year, when i attended two talks by Sophia V. Prater. In short, it is about designing objects before actions and about considering how our brains work. You should read this article  or watch this video to get more detailed information about it by Sophia, who developed that concept/principle.

A design is intuitive when it behaves how a user expects it to. Well, what do users expect? Whenever we find ourselves in a new environment (physical or digital) we want to know:

  • What are the objects here?
  • Where are the objects?
  • How do these objects relate to me and to each other?

Without knowing what and where the objects are, we feel blind. Navigating feels uncomfortable. Taking action might even feel impossible. That’s also the case for digital environments, so we should make sure all objects are easy to identify and not misleading. Make it easy for a user to predict what’s behind all objects, buttons etc.

avoid shapeshifting objects

image

Objects in the real world don’t usually change form as they change context. When I bring a new toaster home from the store, it doesn’t change into a different toaster. In a digital product i might also be confused if an object looks different in different parts of the app. Things that are the same should always look the same.



avoid masked objects

image

(source)

Don’t shove different objects into the same package. If you have a row of buttons/modules that look the same, they should lead to the same type of thing. Different things should always look different.

via Tumblr http://ift.tt/2kNGOpP

mobile UX — personalization 🤳🏼

This is blogpost number 4 of my series „7 aspects that improve the UX of your app“.

image

context aware design: delivering the right information to the user at the right time (source)

We are all different, so why should the apps we use behave the same towards everyone? An interesting aspect in mobile UX is personalization. It focuses on creating experiences that adapt to the user. Similar to adaptive design which adapts to different devices, personalized UI adapts a layout to a person. Mobile app UI design might move further away from being device-focused, and move closer to being user-focused, personalized.

How to make apps more personal

You can implement personalization features during the onboarding of a user (e.g. letting them select their favorite topics) or look for ways to create push notifications that relate to the users last use of the app. Check the information you already have about the user. How can this information help to improve the user experience with personalized features? Of course you should not make it creepy and be transparent about which data (like location) your app requires.

You can use data to segment your users. Users can be sorted according to device, location, space, amount of purchases and time spent. This allows you to make personalized campaigns for particular segments.

In addition, you can look for ways to determine if you should increase the font size, decrease screen brightness, eliminate flashing images or sound. Many apps already have such options in the settings.


I am still looking for good examples in this area, so if you know an app which has some cool personalization features, please send a message!

via Tumblr http://ift.tt/2kimjSv

mobile UX — navigation 📍

This is the third part of my blogpost series “7 aspects that improve the UX of your app” in which i summarize a presentation that i gave a few times this year. 

Navigation is an essential part of the user experience. There are many different options and you should choose one that suits your content best.

This nice illustration by Scott Hurff shows which areas of the screen can be touched naturally and which need stretching of your hand, and the red ones are those that hurt:

image

To me, this is so important that i switched from an iPhone 7 to an iPhone SE – just to be able to use my phone more comfortably with one hand and to reach into the corners easily.

Context

When designing an app you have to think of the context in which your users use it. On top of that, phones keep getting larger and larger. Therefore we have to keep in mind how people will hold their device when using your app.

According to research by Steven Hoober, 49% of people use their thumb to tap/navigate, while holding the phone in one hand.

  • right thumb on the screen: 67%
  • left thumb on the screen: 33%

Only about 10 % of people are left-handed so the 33 % suggest that people use their phone while doing something else with their right hand. (source)

So what can we do, knowing about these challenges?

  • Easy to reach area: Design for the thumb zone, the natural part. You should put important navigation items there, which are used most often.
  • Hard to reach area: keep infrequently used actions there and place negative actions (such as delete) in the hard to reach red zone, because you don’t want users to accidentally tap them.
  • Swipe gestures: when you have a back button in the top left corner, always implement swiping from left to right as well, to give the user this option to navigate. Drawer menus can also be implemented in a way that allows the user to swipe it in, for example from right to left.

Finding the right navigation style for your app

A tab bar (also called „bottom bar“) is suitable in many situations, especially if you have three/four main features. A drill down menu/navigation (structuring the views in a hierarchy from the top downwards) might be a good choice if you don’t have a very complex app. The burger menu (three horizontal lines) should be avoided because it can be problematic as it hides a lot of information. It is even considered by many as the main reason for poor user engagement. A gesture based navigation is tricky because it’s hidden, but since Tinder and Snapchat many people are used to it. I guess it really depends on your target group.

what should you consider for your navigation?

  • because of big screens: the navigation bar (in the top area of the screen) should more often be replaced with more reachable navigation
  • make it consistent, don’t change the location of navigation controls
  • the navigation should communicate the user’s current location in the app
  • make it finger-friendly, not to small touch targets, keep enough spacing between controls

via Tumblr http://ift.tt/2zjoGwd